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NewsLetters

          Holiday 2014 NewsLetter coming soon!

Halloween Hairdo Ideas- He-he-he

Don't be frightened... We're friendly... We're full... Were wolves...

child-girl-young-insects-36

              snakes            S-s-s-s-s-s-s-s-s-s-s . .                       

 

          childmodel                          black3                                  

         green-Halloween-Hairstyles-2012-Ideas-Designs-For-Kids-Girls-F1          hands

 

                                           o-OPRAh               

 

                        long

 

                                                        black2       

                                                                                                               head

                              Frankenstein

  hallowhair          thing             

         women-autumn-leaves-forest-fairy-not-creepy-9        

                                   BUT REMEMBER... always, BUT ALWAYS watch very carefully AT ALL TIMES...

                                                  witch

Have fun, now... he, he

 

 

 

All In Balance . . .

 

 

 stonehenge sunset

 

The Earth is always tilted at an angle of about 23° in relation to the the Sun.  99% of the time, this means either the days or the nights will be longer, depending on whether our location is slanted a little away from, or a little toward, the Sun.

But just twice each year, the Earth tilts neither away from nor towards the Sun- and this is called the equinox, because the amounts of daylight and darkness are closer to equal.

At about 10:30 PM on September 22, 2014, the autumn equinox will occur. This marks the beginning of longer nights and shorter days, but also the harvest season, and is, in many traditions, celebrated with festivals and other celebrations. 

At Stonehenge, it is traditional to watch the sun rise, and then set, to herald the new fall season, and to contemplate the gifts of life and the bounty of the land.  Likely most of us will not be able to attend, but an early rise on the 23rd to see the sun once again call us to the day may suffice. Well . . .  OK, just watch it set, then!

And, dremember to give thanks for the harvest moon, so-called because it rises bright, full and right after sunset (this year on September 8th), making it possible for gatherers to stay in the field thru the night to continue the harvest.  Enjoy!